Don’t be afraid to fail


 

Evel didn't give up - neither should you!

“Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” – Winston Churchill

The number one thing that stands in the way of improving your social media policy is not ability or finances – it’s fear.

Fear that someone will write something mean on your wall.

Fear of the unknown – of a derivation from “the way we’ve always done things.

Fear of failure – that the project won’t be a success.

In his article “Why I Hire People Who Fail”, Jeffrey Stibel, Chairman and CEO of Dun & Bradstreet Credibility Corp., notes:

“We don’t just encourage risk taking at our offices: we demand failure. If you’re not failing every now and then, you’re probably not advancing. Mistakes are the predecessors to both innovation and success, so it is important to celebrate mistakes as a central component of any culture. This kind of culture can only be created by example — it won’t work if it’s forced or contrived. A lively culture is nebulous, indefinable, ever-changing. Try to package it in a formal mission statement and you just may suffocate it.”

 If you really want to dive in to the world of social media, you have to be prepared to meet with some turbulence.  I recently tried a contest to draw more participation to a Facebook page, which was met with less than enthusiastic response. I didn’t  respond by saying, “Well that’s that, no more contests.” Rather I noted which elements worked and which ones didn’t.  If you can separate the two, then that is a success right there. Next time, that knowledge will allow me to try a more refined Facebook contest, building off of these lessons.

Similarly, if you are a manager, you have to accept the occasional failure as the cost of innovation.

Stibel notes, “If you’re not failing every now and then, you’re probably not advancing. Mistakes are the predecessors to both innovation and success, so it is important to celebrate mistakes as a central component of any culture. This kind of culture can only be created by example — it won’t work if it’s forced or contrived. A lively culture is nebulous, indefinable, ever-changing. Try to package it in a formal mission statement and you just may suffocate it.”

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